nitial Incident

FAQ

COMAH Regulations

WSH Officers

Crane Operations

Training Providers

HSE Training

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Safety and Health Management

Radiation Matters

Specific Activities

COVID-19

SHENA Safety Month 2020 Webinar

​Currently, SHENA has embarked on registering Training Providers to ascertain their capability, seeking assurance around their trainers in terms of qualifications and whether training providers possess a means to assess the standard of the training internally.

Furthermore, Training Providers would be requested to show that they have a relevant management system in place to manage the business processes and meet their deliverables. Specific standards have not been developed for Brunei at this time, however, industry would be advised to seek external accreditation as a means to ensure your methodology is appropriate and of quality.

How to apply

To apply, follow these steps:
  • Download the WSH Officer Registration Form
  • Submit the completed WSH Officer Registration Form with all supporting documents, and email to Siti Liyana Binti Abdul Rahim liyana.rahim@shena.gov.bn and Siti Nur Aisyah binti Hamdan aisyah.hamdan@shena.gov.bn
  • Note: a company representative (e.g. HR or Admin) shall submit the registration form for their WSH Officer. SHENA do not support a direct registration by the nominated individual itself.
  • Pay the $110 fee at SHENA Office. The application will only be processed upon payment.
  • Application will receive an email notification if their application is successful. They will also receive the WSH Officer card.

Under the Radiation Protection Order, 2018, a "radioactive material" means any material containing a radioactive substance giving it a specific or total radioactivity greater than 70 becquerels per gram (70 Bq/g) (0.002 u(i/g) or 70 kBq/kg.

Under the Radiation Protection Order, 2018, a controlled apparatus is:

  1. an apparatus that produces ionising radiation when energised or that would, if assembled or repaired, be capable of producing ionising radiation when energised;
  2. an apparatus that produces ionising radiation because it contains radioactive material; and
  3. an apparatus prescribed by regulations made under this Order that produces harmful non-ionising radiation when energised.

The radiation activities that require to be licensed are as follows:

  1. Import and export of radioactive material and/or controlled apparatus;
  2. Use or deal (including storage and disposal) with radioactive material and/or controlled apparatus;
  3. Manufacture of radioactive material and/or controlled apparatus;
  4. Transport of radioactive material; and
  5. Sale of radioactive material and/or controlled apparatus.

Please refer to  the General Guideline for Radiation Licensing Application (2020).

Your company will need to be licensed with the Radiation Department, SHENA before you bring any radioactive material or controlled apparatus  into Brunei Darussalam. Once licensed, you are required to submit an online permit application (www.bdnsw.gov.bn) to the Brunei Darussalam National Single Window (BDNSW) through the Royal Customs and Excise Department (RCED).

Currently there is no disposal facility for radioactive material in Brunei Darussalam. Therefore, your company is required to return the radioactive material to the country of origin / supplier after obtaining written approval from the Authority.

Please note that any disposal of any radioactive material, whether in working condition or otherwise must receive prior written approval of the Authority before disposal, pursuant to Section 6(3) of the Radiation Protection Order, 2018.

Currently there is no disposal facility for controlled apparatus in Brunei Darussalam. In the absence of such facility in Brunei Darussalam, the controlled apparatus is recommended to be returned to the supplier for proper disposal. Your company is advised to seek professional assistance in dismantling the apparatus and ensure the x-ray tube is properly disposed.

Please note that any disposal of any controlled apparatus, whether in working condition or otherwise must receive prior written approval of the Authority before disposal, pursuant to Section 6(3) of the Radiation Protection Order, 2018.

No. Fixed storage facilities that are in use are not allowed to be shared with other companies.

Yes, as stipulated under Section 6(1)(d) of the Radiation Protection Order, 2018.

​No. Any information contained in a permit that has been approved or revoked cannot be amended. The company is advised to resubmit a new permit application through BDNSW.

​Radiation Department, SHENA regulates apparatus or materials that emit ionising radiation. Telecommunication devices do not fall under this category.

​Diesel generators do not emit ionising radiation.

Facilities that carry out operations involving ionising radiation should be licensed with SHENA. By virtue of being licensed, the operators are to carry out procedures that do not pose significant risk to the public and environment.

​You are advised to seek medical assistance. If you are a radiation worker, you are also strongly advised to contact the Radiation Department, SHENA and bring along with you relevant supporting documents.

There is bound to be radiation exposure from cosmic radiation (natural radiation). However, the amount of radiation exposure is not known to cause significant harm to adult, children and unborn child.

​Commercially available X-ray machines are designed to prevent public and worker from being exposed. Nevertheless, radiation worker is required to take extra precaution as part of the workers' safety requirement.

Public is exposed to naturally occurring radioactive material that is present in our environments such as certain fruits, the floors and walls of our homes and even the air we breathe.

The Radiation Protection Order, 2018 can be found in SHENA website www.shena.gov.bn and the Attorney General's Chambers website www.agc.gov.bn.

Every person who sells any radioactive material or controlled apparatus shall immediately give notice of sale to SHENA, together with the name, address and prescribed particulars of the person whom it was sold (Section 6 (2) and 7 (2) of the Radiation Protection Order, 2018). Any person selling radioactive material or controlled apparatus should obtain the appropriate licence for this purpose.

Every person who purchases any radioactive material or controlled apparatus shall immediately give notice of purchase to SHENA, together with the name, address and prescribed particulars of the person whom it was purchased (Section 6(3) and 7 (3) of the Radiation Protection Order, 2018). Any person purchasing radioactive material or controlled apparatus should obtain the appropriate licence for this purpose.

Any person who contravenes these sections is guilty of an offence and liable on conviction in the case of an individual, to a fine not exceeding $100,000 imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or both; and in the case of a body corporate, to a fine not exceeding $10,000,000 (Section 6 (5) and 7(5) of the Radiation Protection Order, 2018).

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are known to cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as pneumonia and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). 

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by the recently discovered coronavirus. It is caused by the new virus which is unknown before the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019.

Evidence has shown that the disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth when a person with COVID-19 coughs, sneezes or exhales. These droplets may also land on objects and surfaces around the person from where other people can catch the COVID-19 virus by touching these objects or surfaces, and thereafter touching their eyes, nose or mouth. 

The Ministry of Health is actively monitoring the evolving situation. The public is advised to remain vigilant, maintain good personal hygiene and to keep abreast with the latest updates from the Ministry of Health
website and press releases, and via their official Instagram page @mohbrunei.

Typical symptoms of COVID-19 may include fever, cough, sore throat and shortness of breath. In more severe infection, it can result in severe chest infection leading to acute respiratory distress or even death, particularly in the elderly and those with chronic medical problems.

The time between catching the virus and the beginning of having symptoms is called the 'incubation period.'  It may take up to 14 days before you develop any symptoms but estimated to be most commonly around 5 days.

Currently, only limited information is available. The risk is thought to be higher for the elderly and people with chronic medical conditions, as is the case with other types of pneumonia. According to the report in the link below, it says that approximately one-third to one-half of reported patients had underlying medical comorbidities, including diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/clinical-guidance-management-patients.html

It is advisable for senior citizens and patients with chronic diseases to take extra precautions, such as avoiding crowded places and public transportation, in addition to daily precautionary measures.

The Ministry of Health has also developed Guidelines for Vulnerable Populations during COVID-19 epidemic which can be accessed here.

Practise simple hygiene habits by covering your mouth and nose with a tissue paper when you cough or sneeze; disposing the tissue paper immediately and washing your hands thoroughly with soap and also regularly. If possible, adopt social or physical distancing and avoid close contact (within ~1 or 2 meters) with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing.


Wash your hands frequently

  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer or washing them with soap and running water. Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand sanitizer kills viruses and bacteria that may be on your hands.
  • Maintain 2 meters physical distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing. When someone coughs or sneezes, small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus are sprayed. If you are in close proximity, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person coughing has the disease.


Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth at all times.

  • Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, your hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and make you sick.


Practise good hygiene etiquette.

  • Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good hygiene etiquette. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately and wash your hands thoroughly with soap and running water or use an alcohol-based sanitizer.

If you have fever, cough and difficulty in breathing, seek medical care early.


Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have fever, cough and difficulty in breathing, call the Ministry of Health's hotline: Health Advice Line 148. You are advised to wear a surgical facemask when you go to the nearest health facility.

In order to prevent the spread of COVID-19, organisations and building owners should take all necessary precautions by providing temperature checks at all entry points, disinfecting all public spaces in the workplace and providing disposable face masks and alcohol-based hand sanitizers for use by staff or visitors, among others.

The Workplace Safety and Health Officer / HSE representative / HSE focal point or relevant health and safety department / unit should promote and communicate necessary information related to tackling the COVID-19 pandemic such as proper cough and sneeze etiquette, correct way to wash hands and social or physical distancing measures. This can be done through various means such as briefings, posters and intranet communications. Ensure to update your protective measures according to the escalation factors and advice provided by MOH and SHENA.

Procedures should be in place to manage staff and/or visitors who are feeling unwell and a Business Continuity Plan (BCP) to be developed to ensure continued operations of the organisation.

SHENA has developed a General Advisory for Workplace in response to COVID-19 which provides guidance as to measures to implement at the workplace to protect employees and curb the spread of COVID-19  can be found here.

SHENA has also prepared a Workplace Assessment Checklist for COVID-19 in English and Malay to be utilized by all workplaces to assess  organizational readiness to respond to COVID-19.

The Ministry of Health has produced infographics on infectious controls measures at the workplace which can be found here as well as protection of the workplace against respiratory infections which can be found here.

A Business Continuity Plan (BCP) outlines the procedures in place in the event of any disasters including pandemics such as COVID-19 and these may include but are not limited to Work from Home (WFH) procedures, segregation of teams and work shifts, reporting procedure when staff is feeling unwell and the use of teleworking to circumvent face to face interactions.

Every organisation should develop and implement their BCP during this time to ensure minimal disruption to operations while also ensuring the safety of their staff and visitors.

If the staff has been diagnosed with COVID-19, the duty officer from Ministry of Health will contact the relevant Head of Department. If you are made aware of the confirmed COVID-19 case from other sources, you may contact the Health Advice line at 148 with contact details of your organisation's dedicated focal point (senior officer) for future correspondences with the Ministry of Health.

The dedicated focal point should then compile a list of all other staff that have been in contact with the confirmed case including those who share an office space, meeting rooms and staff who were in a confined space with the suspected case for more than 30 minutes.

The identified staff should be sent home for self-isolation and the compiled list to be shared by the focal point with the Ministry of Health duty officer and await further instructions.

It is also recommended for the workplace and building to be disinfected especially public areas in accordance with Ministry of Health guidelines.

More details can be found here.

If the Ministry of Health Duty Officer has not contacted you or your organisation yet, you can reach out to them via the Ministry of Health "Health Advice Line 148". Contact tracing will be the responsibility of the team at the Ministry of Health (MOH) who will undertake to identify close contacts of the confirmed cases.  This is to determine if the nature of contact poses risk of virus transmission.  If you have been identified as a close contact of the confirmed case, you will be advised on the measures that you should take i.e. in this case you will be asked to go for a swab test and will have to undergo self-isolation (under quarantine order).

Close contacts are defined as:

(i) anyone who has had close contact with a confirmed case within about 1 meter distance for at least 30 minutes in an enclosed area or; 

(ii) anyone who has stayed at the same place (e.g. household, office space, social gathering) with a confirmed case. The health status of all close contacts will be monitored closely for 14 days from their last exposure to the case.

It is also recommended for the workplace and building to be disinfected especially public areas in accordance to Ministry of Health guidelines which can be found here.

For further enquiries you may contact the Ministry of Health 24-hour hotline at 148 or visit healthinfo.gov.bn for more information.

This will depend on whether you have been in close contact (within 1 meter or less) with the case who was tested positive for a period of about 30 minutes or more – then you may be considered at risk and will be asked to go for a test.


If you have only met him/her for a short time or only spoke briefly or passed by him/her, then your risk of infection is low. Please monitor your health by checking your temperature twice a day. If you develop fever, cough or any respiratory symptoms, please wear a facemask and seek medical attention promptly. Call the Health Advice Line 148 for further advice on where you should go to seek medical attention in this case. By following good hygiene practices and precautions, you can reduce the potential of contracting the illness.

​Yes, there are guidelines that have been set by the Ministry of Health. You can get these from their website here.


Some quick guidance:

  • Ensure workstations are regularly disinfected, including equipment, based on manufacturer's recommendations.
  • All work surfaces should be cleaned at least daily with detergent and water, and disinfectant if necessary (e.g. 1 in 99 diluted household bleach of 5.25% solution).
  • Frequently touched areas such as escalator handrails, lift control panels, door knobs, light switches etc. should be cleaned more often subject to the frequency of use.
  • Hard floor surfaces should be cleaned with wet vacuum system or damp mopping using detergent and water.
  • Clean public toilets at least once a day and as when necessary especially if visibly soiled or presence of an unpleasant odour. Wipe the rim, seat and lid of toilet bowl with 1 in 99 diluted household bleach (5.25%) solution, rinse with water and then wipe dry.


Cleaning supervisors should undertake regular monitoring to ensure that hygiene standards are strictly observed.

Based on Ministry of Health's Guidelines on Social Gatherings and events, Meetings or Training Sessions; any meetings or training sessions should not exceed more than 30 people. Please ensure social or physical distancing measures are applied (at least 1 to 2 meters apart), as well as keeping a record of all attendees contact details (name and phone numbers). 

It is also advised to remind all the participants that if they are unwell, they should not come to the meeting or training sessions. Keep the room well ventilated by opening windows if possible and remind the participants to frequently wash their hands with running water and soap or use hand sanitizers. 

However, keep in mind that although the limit is 30 people, this would also depend on the size of the room being used. Hence the importance of allowing for at least 1 to 2 meters social or physical distancing between individuals in a certain space.

It is highly recommended for organisations to conduct their meetings and/or trainings via teleconferencing whenever possible.


The Guidelines on Social Gatherings and events, Meetings or Training Sessions can be found here.

Generally, it should be safe to receive and handle documents from external parties. Studies have shown that coronaviruses may persist on surfaces for a few hours up to several days depending on the different conditions e.g. type of surface, temperature or humidity in the environment.

However, if you think a document may be contaminated you may take extra precautions such as cleaning with simple disinfectant or leaving it out in the sun for a few hours, also ensuring those who handle the documents wash their hands with soap and running water or use hand sanitizer. Always avoid touching eyes, mouth and nose.

Yes, it should be safe to use the elevator given that social or physical distancing (1 meter or more) is maintained and the area including elevator buttons are disinfected regularly by the organization or building owner.

Since the 16 March 2020, all citizens and residents of Brunei Darussalam have been restricted from leaving the country, except in certain circumstances such as undergoing urgent medical care, attending court hearings or resuming study abroad.

If a business trip or essential travel is required, permission needs to be obtained through the Prime Minister's Office. Requests for permission to leave the country can now be applied online from the Prime Minister's Office website. Further information can also be obtained from the Guidelines for Application to Exit Country for Citizens and Residents of Brunei Darussalam from the aforementioned website.

Employers shall ensure employees abide with the necessary actions taken upon their return of travelling from countries based on the instructions given by the Ministry of Health.

The Ministry of Health has categorised worker's exposure to COVID-19 here and utility workers are considered to have low exposure risk. In the instance that there is an individual undergoing self-isolation in that household, it should still be safe for workers to enter the home given that a healthy person attends to the worker and the self-isolating individual is complying with the self-isolation guidelines in which the individual must stay in his/her room at all times.

Organisations and individuals can make financial donations directly to the COVID-19 Relief Fund via online transfers with the current account number 1010070123 (BIBD) or via the BIBD mobile app. The COVID-19 Relief Fund was first launched by the Yang Berhormat Minister at the Prime Minister's Office and Minister of Finance and Economy II on 21 March 2020 with the objective of easing the financial burden on managing and tackling COVID-19 in the country. (reference)

There is also an opportunity to become a volunteer under the Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sports to aid in the COVID-19 situation. The application form can be found here.

To find out more about what support is required by the Ministry of Health, you may contact the Ministry of Health Emergency Operations Centre at 2381383.

You can get the latest global statistics and situation on COVID-19 from the World Health Organisation (WHO) COVID-19 Situation Report here.

Brunei Darussalam recorded its first COVID-19 case on the 9th March 2020.  For the latest statistics, press releases and information concerning COVID-19 in Brunei Darussalam, you can visit the Ministry of Health Website
here.

​The Presentation and all other presentations delivered during SHENA Safety Month can be found here

​SHENA is developing an Industry Guidance Note on the requirements to ensure suitable safety measures, signage, labelling and controls are in place with the storing, handling and use of chemicals. This includes the use of the Global Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals. Under the Workplace Safety and Health (General Provisions) Regulations, 2014, the occupier, principal and employer of a workplace (which includes shop premises) is under a duty to obtain the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) for the chemicals and ensure persons are aware of the safety measures in relation to the chemicals. 


It is recommended that all persons involved in the manufacturer and supply of chemicals and those involved in the mixing of chemicals, shall classify and adequately label their products, develop and prepare a relevant SDS and ensure that information on such products are shared to all customers or users dealing with these chemicals.

Personal Protective Equipment when using chemicals would be dependent on the type of chemical, how hazardous they are and concerns involved. This detail would be available within the Safety Data Sheet (SDS). At the minimum, persons handling chemicals should be provided with safety goggles, half face mask respirator with suitable filter, chemical resistant gloves, suitable coveralls (chemical suits would be applicable in some cases), safety boots. Persons should be trained in handling chemicals and the PPE provided.

Any controls or restrictions for importation of chemicals should be referred to the Ministry of Health or the Royal Customs and Excise Department. SHENA is only mandated under the Workplace Safety and Health (General Provisions) Regulations, 2014 to look at the safety aspect of the chemicals (Hazardous Substances is defined in Part II of the Fifth Schedule to the Workplace Safety and Health Order, 2009), that is, its management in all workplaces.  Import controls do not fall under SHENA's purview.

SHENA wishes to work and collaborate with all its stakeholders in the implementation of suitable measures that ensure compliance with relevant laws and practices for the country. In particular, SHENA aims to seek the support of industrial stakeholders in the implementation of the Global Harmonised System for Classification and Labelling, as well as Chemical Inventory assessment and mitigation measures. Proactive support from the industrial community in the implementation of good chemical management practices would be a relevant expectation.

The implementation of chemical management and enforcement in Brunei Darussalam involves not only SHENA but other stakeholders from Government as well. SHENA's role is to look at the safety aspect of the chemicals in a workplace and how it is managed.  In answer to your question, SHENA's involvement in looking at chemical storage procedures, designs and security would be limited to the HSE aspect.

You are reminded to comply with the law when working at heights. Under the Workplace Safety and Health Order (General Provisions) Regulations, 2014, any person who has to work at a place from which he would be liable to fall a distance of more than 2 metres shall be provided with a secure foothold and handhold at the place so far as is reasonably practicable for ensuring his safety.

Under the Workplace Safety and Health (Construction) Regulations, 2014, regulation 22 (2) states that every open side or opening into or through which a person is liable to fall more than 2 metres shall be covered or guarded by effective guard-rails, barriers or other equally effective means to prevent fall.

The distance of more than 2 metres stated under the law is NOT inclusive of the person's height.

Yes, Internal or Inhouse Training is sufficient if it is conducted by a trainer who is certified to provide such course or training. Internal or inhouse training by uncertified individuals is therefore not sufficient.

Please be informed that Scaffolding Training is different from Work at Height Training. A Scaffolder is not required to attend Work at Height Training but MUST complete Scaffolding training. If he wishes to attend Work at Height Training, this is only in addition to the mandatory Scaffolding training that he must undertake.

Immediate safety infringements of concern can be reported to SHENA's Duty Officer at +673 7332200

No, this is not advisable as it may hinder the effectiveness of the safety helmet. Manufacturer's advice and safety standards would apply.

Please refer to SHENA IGN/2020/02 - Guidance to Work at Height available on the SHENA Website which contains guidance on emergency response procedures including rescue methods.

SHENA has already undertaken monitoring visits and inspections on workplaces including construction sites.to enforce the provisions of the Workplace Safety and Health Order, 2009 and its regulations. If you observe an unsafe work practice, you are advised to contact SHENA concerning the matter whereby SHENA can further investigate the matter. Safety infringements of concern can be reported to SHENA's Duty Officer at +673 7332200

Yes, the combination of H-frame and G.I. pipes scaffolds system IS permissible, however they should be inspected for design suitability by a competent person. You are advised to refer to IGN/2020/01 - Guidelines for the Safe Use of Scaffolding for further information on this matter.